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ABOUT

The Hamburg University of Applied Sciences and the Audio Engineering Society Student Section Hamburg are pleased to announce the second installment of klingt gut! Symposium on Sound at the Arts and Media Campus in Hamburg.

For three days international artists and scientists will present their work in the fields of sound design, sound art, electro-acoustic music, and the interdependence of aesthetics and technology.

Participants will enjoy a series of informative lectures, hands-on workshops, and interactive panel discussions as well as cutting edge installations and performances at Germany’s most state-of-the-art media campus.

TOPICS 2016

immersive and 3D-audio and virtual realities // audio semantics // sound design, sound art // ethnomusicology and philosophy of sound/media // interfaces for music and sound // soundscapes, electronic music and musique concrète // audio-visual installations // sound design for film // cross media art // interactive design and art

Front-Cover-klingtgut

Program 2016

Our preliminary program for the Symposium 2016. Changes are possible and will be announced in advance.

PROGRAM 2016

Lecture Sessions (Thursday-Saturday)

L1: Sound Art, Philosophy of Sound and Media #1
L2: Immersive Audio
L3: Sound Art, Philosophy of Sound and Media #2
L4: Sound Design and Sound Art
L5: Semantic Sound and Sound Branding

Tutorials (Friday & Saturday)

T0: Creation of Dynamic Immersive Audio Scenes
T1: Virtual Analog Modeling using System Identification
T2: Virtual Concert Halls
T3: Field Recording
T4: Surround and 3D Recording
T5: Composing for Film and TV

Artwork Exhibition / Presentations  (Thursday-Saturday)

Audiovisual Installations
Sound Art and Fixed Media Works
Video Art
Artistic Performances
Meet the Artists / Roundtables

Opening (Thursday)

Keynote: Cultural Anthropological Perspectives on Sound Design
Opening Ceremony with Katharina Fegebank, Second Mayor and Senator of Science of the State of Hamburg
Champagne Reception & Concert

Special Events (Friday & Saturday)

Q&A: Martyn Ware on Electronic Music and Immersive Audio (Friday)
Q&A: Carla Bley and Steve Swallow on Avant-Garde in Music (Saturday)
 
Late Night Concert & Barbecue (Friday)
 
Panel Discussion: Entrepreneurship in Sound Design (Saturday)
 
“klingt gut!” / AES Hamburg Student Award, Best Student Artwork (Saturday)
Host: John Krivit, AES President

Performative Lectures (Friday)

PL1: Creating Electronic Sounds
PL2: Hybrid Musical Instruments
PL3: Audio Drama and Sound Art

Workshops (Thursday-Saturday)

W: Build Your Own Synthesizer*
W: Field Recording
W: Composing for Film and TV*
W EDU: Live Sound Mixing with 3D Audio Systems
W EDU: Creating 3D Soundscapes with Games Engines
W EDU: Film Mixing with Nuage
W EDU: Ableton Live / Push
W EDU: Studio ONE, Sounddesign possibilities
* special registration required
EDU Workshops: “klingt gut” Educational Track w/ free entrance for students, starting on Wednesday 25th

Technical Showrooms (Thursday-Saturday)

Modular Synthesizers #1
Modular Synthesizers #2
Analog Music Studio
Virtual Reality
3D Audio
Virtual Acoustic Spaces

SCHEDULE

We are still working out some small details of the program so please excuse any slight changes here on our homepage.
Exact order of events is subject to change.

Beata Anna Targosz

Sounds of an exhibition. An exhibition of sounds. The sound of art places. | L1: Sound Art, Philosophy of Sound and Media #1

The project: "Sounds of an exhibition. An exhibition of sounds. The sound of art places." is dedicated to sound as a medium in exhibition design. The main creation consist of sound layers for 4 selected exhibitions, where – in my opinion – designed sound would support an exhibition scenario. It is a statement that grew up after DAAD Research and was carried out between 2014 and 2015. Prepared as an exhibition space, project was presented in two chapters: Process of creation and Creation. 1st chapter displayed results of research, sketches, quotes and documentation. 2nd is an audio space – Quadrafonic System, and its visual description – video and info posters. Sound layers were designed in cooperation with Davi Rodriguez de Lima. During the symposium I would like to show the project (I have already sent my artwork application) and – as I find the topic very interesting to discuss – I would like to present the idea and tell about the process of researching and designing.

30mins

Forum Finkenau

Beata Anna Targosz

Beata Anna Targosz lives and works in Berlin. Graduated University of Arts in Berlin and Academy of Fine Arts in Gdansk. Coming from interior/space design, interested in sound as a medium commenting dialogue between an art piece and a space of its display. Last project was dedicated to the use of sound in exhibition design.

Vadim Keylin

Urban Resonance: Site-Specific Sound Sculpture | L1: Sound Art, Philosophy of Sound and Media #1

Public space has always played a prominent role in sound art – both as a venue and as an object of artistic exploration. From soundscape composition to Aeolian art to large-scale outdoor installations, sound artists have extensively explored the issues of spatial identity, urban ecology and social engagement. It is especially true for sound sculpture, the situating of which in a public space gives way to a complex interplay between the sounds produced by the work and the ones already existing in the environment. This interplay, however, is underpinned by social relationships. On the one hand, sound sculpture is an essentially participatory art form, as it invites its audience to co-author what they hear and shapes them into an artist collective. On the other hand, the majority of sounds, existing in urban space, are also products of social relationships, as is the space itself, according to Henri Lefebvre. The participatory nature of urban sound sculpture allows for a reading of ist interactions with the site through the lens of Nicolas Bourriaud’s relational aesthetics. The basis of my presentation is the study of four sound artists and groups, whose work engages with the public space. The artistic collective O+A creates acoustic interventions into inhospitable urban soundscapes, using resonant bodies and electronic processing as filters that refine the place, transforming its noises into harmonies. Benoit Maubrey’s monumental speaker- sculptures extend the public space into the media sphere, subverting the antagonism between the two. With their sonic bikes, artists and engineers of the Bicrophonic Research Institute reinvent the soundscapes of city streets, shifting the perspective from muting or musicalizing traffic noise to making traffic itself musical. Jodi Roses’s work is concerned with reframing the cable bridges, singing in the wind, as found sound sculptures through site-specific performance and field recording. These four case studies show the sound sculpture’s unique ability to uncover the connections and intersections: of the natural and the urban, the found and the artistic, the community and the environments. Soliciting audience participation, both witting (through engaging its audience in sound-making) and unwitting (through appropriating the community-produced urban sounds) sound sculpture reconfigures the public space and can serve as an instrument for enhancing urban living conditions.

30min

Forum Finkenau

Vadim Keylin

Vadim Keylin is a Russian cultural studies scholar, sound artist and poet. He is currently a PhD student at the State Institute for Art Studies, Moscow. Keylin’s research focuses on sound sculpture and the way this art form emphasizes the corporeal and participatory nature of sound. He has published papers on sound art in peer-reviewed journals Organised Sound, Gli spazi della musica and others. Keylin is a co-founder (together with philosopher Michael Kurtov) of the open lectures cycle Sound Grammars at the St. Petersburg Sound Museum.

Ask Kæreby

Danish electronic and/or concrete music| L1: Sound Art, Philosophy of Sound and Media #1

I will focus on the part of the Danish electronic and/or concrete music–at the time called electrophonics– which was produced by or for the Danish Broadcasting Corporation. The first production of electronic music in Denmark can be attributed to a TV programme on the oldest operating amusement park in the world Dyrehavsbakken north of Copenhagen. It was conceived by the composer Else Marie Pade, who was inspired by the musique concrète of Pierre Schaeffer. The soundtrack for the TV programme used both manipulated sound recordings and a sine tone with added echo-effect, to illustrate the act of a stunt man. In this way, the soundtrack can be said to have concrete as well as electronic elements, and so the French musique concrète and the German elektronische Musik–who were at odds at the time–were both included in the first Danish production of electronic sound. The first half decade of electronic music in Denmark was characterised by voluntary contributions from individuals and groupings, all the while there was an interest in establishing a permanent electronic studio within the Broadcasting Corporation. A proposal was put forward in the summer of 1959 and rejected–an electronic studio was a private matter and a task for larger countries, according to the programme director. So the national broadcaster decided to wait and see, and kept an eye out for Sweden, where a similar proposal was presented two years before. However, it was not until 1965 that a former radio studio in Stockholm was converted to a “sound workshop” for composers and poets to experiment in. The following year, the Danish Broadcasting Corporation agreed to use the ambitious EMS-studio in Stockholm, which was in the works at the time, and a small number of Danish productions took place there in the years 1968-73. The interest in having a publicly available electronic studio in Denmark lived on, and in 1979-80 it was picked up by the Danish Music Council. They noted that the Broadcasting Corporation did not see themselves as good caretakers of such a venture and finally in 1987, the Danish Institute for Electroacoustic Music was established in Aarhus, the second largest city in Denmark. By all means a remarkably late start for a national electronic studio in a European country, almost 40 years after the first attempts by Schaeffer and others!

30min

Forum Finkenau

Ask Kæreby

Ask Kæreby is a Danish composer and researcher. He studied music production in Copenhagen, earning a MMus degree from The Royal Danish Academy of Music. Kæreby’s artistic practice is interdisciplinary and research-based, involving experimental composition, sound design and electroacoustic music. He is interested in the presentation of narratives by means of sound – not through traditional musical gestures, but using different approaches such as musique concrète or the futurists’ bruitism. Working in the intersection between known formats, Kæreby wishes to challenge our ways of listening – to music (live as well as recorded), to our surroundings and to (sonic) art.

Mehmet Can Özer

Aşure: Tradition Meets Electroacoustic Music | L1: Sound Art, Philosophy of Sound and Media #1

“Aşure” is a real-time improvisational tool/environment. It can be considered as “electroacoustic reflections of traditional inspiration” where the traditional instruments have found new places. (Kahramankaptan, 2009) Aşure is also a traditional dessert which originates from the Prophet Noah. According to legend when his ark settled to Ararat after the flood, he made a pudding with what he had left as aliment.
Aşure (Ashure in English, also known as Noah’s Pudding) is a traditional Turkish dessert consisting of fruits, nuts and grains. It is served during the 10th day of Muharrem month in the Islamic Calendar to commemorate the Ark's landing and shared with people without regard to their religion or belief system as an offering of peace and love. Aşure does not have a single recipe as recipes vary between regions and families. (Özer, 2007)

30min

Forum Finkenau

Mehmet Can Özer

Fabian Röttcher

New 3D Audio- Installation of the Digital Signal Processing laboratory | L2: Immersive Audio

This contribution presents the new 3D Audio- Installation of the Digital Signal Processing laboratory at the University of Applied Sciences Emden/Leer. The installation has been designed to provide 3D audio research and production facilities for students on media technology, electrical engineering and computer sciences. The 3D installation basically provides a 22.2 loudspeaker layout, which covers nearly all recent concepts on the market. The system is equipped with near field monitors for the satellites. These speakers have been selected by a comparative speaker test. Usability for a multi speaker layout was of particular importance, therefore speakers were selected that provide calibration and remote control. Delay and level compensation of the individual loudspeakers can be achieved by the hardware of the audio interface. Due to Class-D amplification the entire system requires only a single power supply. On the mechanical side, we build up an octahedron using aluminium square profiles. This construction has been modelled using a 3D-CAD tool. An important requirement was the possibility to adjust the speakers position quickly for other setups. The octahedron can be easily disassembled and transported to other sites. A computer provides classical digital audio workstations as known in the film- and music-industry as well as experimental software for future tests and researches. With these several programs or plugins, we are able to use all major play back concepts. These include the channel-based, object-based, and scene-based approaches. First tests with all these concepts have been made after the construction of the octahedron. The acoustical environment of the 3D-audio system is of particular importance. It quickly turned out that the room needs acoustical treatment. For a first estimation the room acoustics were simulated and the reverberation time was determined. The octahedron has been placed virtually in a detailed room model. Running a ray tracing model indicated regions of strong reverberation. As these would end up in localisation problem, future projects will contain the acoustical modification and improvement of the local environment. Other future projects will cover innovative signal processing algorithms and development of plugins acoustical signal processing. Finally, the design of production tools for 3D audio is of specific interest.

30min

Forum Finkenau

Fabian Röttcher

Fabian Röttcher studies media technology at University of Applied Sciences Emden/Leer. His first video projects started back in 2003 during his school time. Whenever it is possible he helps the sound engineering team at Jazz Club Minden. In 2011 he began his first jobs as a free camera-operator until he started to work for the University of Applied Sciences Emden/Leer in late 2013 as student assistant for the data- center and the faculty of technology. The main fields are media- and event-technology as well as video-engineering. Recently he finished together with Jannik Billker and Kevin Winkelvoß his study project on realizing a 3D Audio Installation, supervised by Prof. Dr.-Ing Johann-Markus Batke (co- author), at the Digital Signal Processing Laboratory. In March 2016 he started his practical period at Studio Hamburg Media Consult International GmbH.

Steffen Armbruster

Immersivity in video and audio projects and the tools used to achieve this goal |L2: Immersive Audio

At the beginning I want to introduce immersive video installations that I produced and how we achieved the desired immersive effects. Projects like the 360° towerinstalllation for Lufthansa where we build a space in shape of the interior of a airport tower and then used 9 projectors to project a 360° panorama installation. A other example are the media installations for the Swiss pavillion at the Expo in Yeosu, Korea where I lead the production for Tamschick Media & Space. The topic was “Water”. Starting in a small dark walkway where you could “catch” projections like waterdrops the visitor then entered a cristaline room with a panorama projection of the alps. As the highlight the visitor entered a round room with mirrored walls. In the middle of the room was a round basin with water. We projected on the water surface which then reflected in the mirrors and so filled the entire room. Depending on the time left I would introduce one or two more projects. More and more the projects tried to immerse people by responding directy to the individual. For example with realtime generated content. While working on projects like these I realised, that all these projects immerse the visitors visually. Audio is used but usually in a very “normal” way. Several loudspeakers... . All the installations are limited to a defined area inside a greater exhibition, museum and so on. I came up with the idea, that it would be interesting to produce a immersive sound installation that gives every individual his own acoustic experience. I realized that there is no existing system that can do this. So after a while of digging deap into the subject I had an idea how this could be done. The outcome of this is that I found a company that developed a system that gives a whole new connection between sound and space. The user carries a device like a smartphone and he wears headphones. By traking each user individually as precise as 10 cm in position and 1 degree in rotation we can place sounds and soundatmospheres in space. The user can then explore the space in a new way, acoustically. Not only visual content is placed in a room but also sounds, whole soundscapes, sometimes connected to the visual content, sometimes in sync to film sometimes not at all connected to the visual level. The system usomo – unique sonic moments – will be ready for commercial use in the middle of 2016 after 2 years of development. Already now the first projects are beeing planed. My idea is to introduce the new possibilities of the system and the immersive experience it gives to the user. I would also like to setup a demoinstallation to make it possible to the audience to experience this new way of soundinstallation for themselves. We present the system since about 8 weeks to experts and it shows, that even audioenthusiasts are fascinated after they experienced the system.

30min

Forum Finkenau

Steffen Armbruster

Since almost 20 years Steffen works in the production of spacial media installations. During his time as Head of the 3D & Motion Unit at dan pearlman markenarchitektur and as Head of Production at Tamschick Media + Space he was responsible for the production, postproduction and implementation of large scale installations worldwide. In the last two years Steffen developed with his own team a new immersive audiosystem that offers a until today not experienced connection between space and sound.

Felix Eichas

Presentation about Virtual Analog Modeling using System Identification | T1

Vintage equipment is very popular amongst musicians and sound engineers. Therefore it reaches horrendous prices due to high demand and limited supply. For this reason it would be desirable to digitally recreate the sound of analog audio equipment by virtual analog modeling. A digital model has manifold advantages, when compared to an analog system. A digital system always produces the same output to a given input and is not influenced by damaged or aging electronic components. Most audio systems have nonlinear components, like diodes, transistors, transformers or vacuum tubes in the signal path which aggravates the modeling process. Known modeling techniques examine the circuit of the audio system with nodal analysis and construct a digital state-space system or wave digital filter with special extensions for the nonlinear circuit elements. These methods gives very convincing results, but the current-voltage characteristic of every non-linear circuit element has to be known. This leads to extensive measurements, which are tedious and expensive. Therefore it would be eligible to model the analog reference device only by measurements of it's input/ output relations. These measurements can be automated and performed with any audio interface. Furthermore the computational demands of computing a state-space model (with nonlinear extensions) are so high, that the emulation of complex audio systems, like a guitar amplifier, can not be done without simplifications of the resulting digital model. This session will give a brief overview of virtual analog modeling techniques and focuses on emulating guitar effect pedals, which modify the sound of an electric guitar, before it is fed into the amplifier. Especially the emulation of nonlinear effects, like distortion and compression is approached. Moreover the measurement setup, used to measure the input/output relations of the effect pedals with specifically designed test signals is shown. The chosen digital models will be explained in detail for distortion effects and dynamic range controllers. The modeling process is explained in detail and virtual analog models of different effect units (e.g. Ibanez Tube-Screamer or Hughes & Kettner Tube Factor) are presented. The capability of this method is emphasized with audio examples for different types of distortion effects.

60min

3030

Felix Eichas

Eldad Tsabary

Laptop orchestra: An alocal, hybrid, innovative culture| L3: Sound Art, Philosophy of Sound and Media #2

The laptop orchestra is an electroacoustic ensemble of digital instruments such as laptops, tablets, smartphones, and various controllers. The great majority of laptop ensembles are Euro-American, located most prominently in USA, Canada, and UK. Laptop ensembles exist in over 20 other countries, however, including China, Iran, Israel, Japan, Lebanon, Russia, Turkey, and others. Focusing on telematic collaborative improvisation and online performances, ensembles such as Giaso, Global Net Orchestra, Avatar Orchestra, Shared Buffer, and Ethernet Orchestra are multilocal in nature. The laptop orchestra is a diverse global performance medium that depends on improvisatory practices for its evolution. It manifests in varying and constantly evolving artistic, social, and technological formats that are alocal in nature—that is, they do not demonstrate identifiable cultural traits associated with the ensembles’ localities or their members’ cultural origins. While the complex web of cultural, geographical, and human influences on individuals are likely to affect their characters, skills, perceptual habits, and creative and improvisational practices; these influences are too many, too varied, and too rapidly changing to be isolatable or traceable. This alocal nature of laptop orchestra practice is therefore a perceived trait more than a factual one. While some argue that the history of laptop performance is rooted in Western traditions, I posit that laptop performance (or even the laptop instrument for that matter) is not Western, but an art form born in the Global Village. Ist untraceable multilocality, or alocality, is ist home—its cultural essence. I argue that this art form is better referred to as a culture of similar beliefs and behaviors (improvisation, hybridity, interdisciplinarity, innovation, collaboration, and others) rather than a genre or a medium due to its tradition-defying, multidimensional hybridic nature. Through interviews I conducted with laptop orchestra directors and members in Canada, Australia, Iran, China, and Brazil, I will provide an outline of laptop orchestra culture, ist traits, and its alocal nature. Additionally, I will demonstrate how (primarily non-idiomatic) improvisation serves as a crucial evolutionary force of laptop orchestra, both locally in each ensemble and accumulatively in global laptop orchestra practice.

30min

Forum Finkenau

Eldad Tsabary

Dr. Eldad Tsabary is a professor of electroacoustic music at Concordia University in Montreal. He is founder and director of Concordia Laptop Orchestra (CLOrk)—a large electronic ensemble which specializes in interdisciplinary collaborative performances in which students function as co-creators/co-researchers. In the past decade, Eldad has also spearheaded research and development of a new aural training method for electroacoustic musicians that is inspired by perception studies and a transformational, democratic educational model. Eldad received his doctorate in music education from Boston University. He is the current president of the Canadian Electroacoustic Community (CEC).

Philipp Ludwig Stangl

Inside the high velocity cloud | L3: Sound Art, Philosophy of Sound and Media #2

„The history of every art form has critical periods in which the particular form strains after effects which can be easily achieved only with a changed technical standard, that is to say, in a new art form.“ As Walter Benjamin notes in his iconic easy, "The work of art in the age of mechanical reproduction" (1936), every art form makes demands which strongly challenge its own limitations. Artists use methods which seem, at least in retrospect to strive toward new technologies that seem more naturally suited to this particular artistic practice. In the digital cloud, music of any era, genre and geographical location is accessible to everybody at any time. In addition to the mere auditory image, the digital audio snippet itself has increasingly become the structural material for innovative musical renderings in the digital workflow. The artistic practice of scaling and recombining digital artifacts represents the principal differance between analog and digital sound creation: what once was a simulation, as a technique of citation in traditional composition has become a framework for virtual musical art. In this constellation of musical practice of "remix" and "mesh up", references themselves become the art form. This lecture sheds light on the question of musical creation between simulation and virtual composition.

30min

Forum Finkenau

Philipp Ludwig Stangl

Philipp Ludwig Stangl works as a composer and video artist for major theatres and produced intermedia compositions on behalf of numerous institutions. His works have been performed at international festivals and guest performances. He studied composition and visualization at the Folkwang University of the Arts in Essen. He taught as a lecturer at Folkwang University and held various guest lectures. Since 2012 he holds a professorship for “artistic media practice / audiovisual design” at the University of Music and Performing Arts Mannheim.

Ludwig Müller

Virtual Concert Hall | T2

I have developed a Virtual Concert Hall as an experimental application and approach to sound design using the game engine Unity3D and the sound engine FMOD. Using an Xbox-Controller, the user can navigate in first-person inside a simple 3D-model of a concert hall. In this environment, 21 microphone signals from a concert provided by the Berlin Philharmonics are positioned according to their original setup in the philharmonic hall. Floating spheres represent those signals visually. When the user moves around the concert hall, e.g. with an Xbox-360-controller, every audio source is panned, filtered, adjusted in volume and mixed with reverb according to fine-tuned parameters in FMOD. This allows the user to move through a surprisingly realistic sound field and discover the Berlin Philharmonics in an immersive, unheard-of way. FMOD supports speaker configurations from stereo up to 7.1-surround and also binaural sound for headphones. This still ongoing project was born almost by accident when I started creating sounds for a video game for the first time and wanted to test the audio capabilities of Unity and FMOD. At the same time, the Berlin Philharmonics commissioned the Film University's sound department to find new concepts for immersive sound regarding their online streaming platform "Digital Concert Hall" . The application is partly intended as experimental "edutainment": Users can approach any instrument and examine its sound, but also step back and understand the function of the instrument in the context of the entire arrangement. The orchestra is represented in an abstract way, so that the focus shifts onto the sound. Additionally, my project suggests a new approach for conceptualising sound design and –engineering projects. For example, at university we regularly record film scores with the Filmorchester Babelsberg in very narrow timeframes with little room for experimentation. Now, if demo recordings from the composer are available, different positions for the musicians/microphones can be simulated and discovered prior to the actual recording session using the virtual concert hall. Sound designers who work for theatre and installations could use this environment to simulate their installations or even control them live during showtime. My future plans with this project are to connect it with PureData and the IOSONO amisonics renderer to allow for an even higher number of speakers, including height channels. Also, I want to port the project to Oculus rift for a more immersive visual experience. Lastly, I will use this environment to design an interactive music video for a band using Unity's web player.

60min

Holodeck

Ludwig Müller

Ludwig Müller (*1990 in Regensburg, Germany) studies „Sound for Picture“ at Film University Babelsberg with a focus on interactive media. On the side, he works as an assistant sound engineer at the Berlin Philharmonic Hall for Deutschlandradio Kultur. His first came in touch with sound design as an acting student and DAAD scholar at Concordia University Montréal. He recently designed the sounds for the play „What the rhino saw on the other side of the fence“ at Deutsches Nationaltheater Weimar.

Sara Pinheiro

Acousmatic Foley | L4: Sound Design and Sound Art

Acousmatic Foley researches the connection between two sonic worlds mostly treated as parallel. The combination of “acousmatic” and “foley” appears to be an oxymoron. On the one hand, the main principle of acousmatic music is to disengage sound from its visual source. On the other hand, foley is the covering of an action with sounds that are visually justifiable, although they may not naturally belong there. Nevertheless, what links an acousmatic composer to a foley artist is that the latter makes use of objects for their layout, for a sonic construction that matches visually what we expect to hear, rather than the concrete visual matter. The argument is that every foley artist is an acousmatic composer. Likewise, the acousmatic composer is focused on the use of sound effects to present their concepts. In short, both fields deal with the same conception of sound objects, as in the tradition of musique concrète (Schaeffer, 1966) and soundscape theory (Schaffer, 1977). The paper investigates the circularity of these subjects. It addresses sound as a dramaturgic practice, involving the notion of stage (with a mise-en-scène) and its characters. It requires a model of composition based on presentational strategies. Thus, it takes into consideration three elements of sound performativity: the loudspeakers as stage advocates, the sounds as actors and, consequently, the listener as the final extremity of these articulations.

30min

Forum Finkenau

Sara Pinheiro

Sara Pinheiro is a sound-maker. For film and video art, she does recording, editing, foley and mixing. On her own, she makes acousmatic pieces for multichannel performances, broadcasts or installations. She graduated in Cinema (Lisbon, 2008) and holds a Master in Sonology (The Hague, 2012). She is a guest lecturer at The Institute of Sonology and at CAS, in Famu (Prague). Currently, her project “Acousmatic Foley” is in progress with a new mixed-media performance (Barcelona, Lisbon and Prague) and an upcoming publication on the Organised Sound Journal. She is part of the live-coding group kolektiv and collaborates with the Barrandov Film Studios, in Prague.

Maximilian Kock

Influence of audio design on the identical moving picture | L4: Sound Design and Sound Art

Vortrag über Studie: ‘Der Einfluss unterschiedlicher Audiogestaltung bei gleichem Bewegtbild' Sounddesign und seine Wirkung ist seit zwanzig Jahren ein Thema, das mich beruflich beschäftigt: • Wie verändert Sounddesign ( Geräusche) die Rezeption des Zuschauer/ Zuhörers? • Was passiert dann zusätzlich bei der Addition von (Film-)Musik? Über die Wirkung von Filmmusik bei der Rezeption von Video ist schon viel geforscht worden, über die Wirkung von Sounddesign bis heute im Vergleich dazu relativ wenig. Für meine Studien verwende ich die Applikation EmoTouch der Universität Osnabrück (Institut für Musikwissenschaft und Musikpädagogik). Mittlerweile haben 240 Probanden die Versuche absolviert und es gibt schon sehr interessante Ergebnisse und Erkenntnisse. Bis zum Frühjahr kommenden Jahres möchte ich die nun anstehenden Auswertungen abgeschlossen haben. Erste Ergebnisse habe ich schon im musikwissenschaftlichen Seminar an der Universität Osnabrück vorgestellt. Letzten Monat habe ich die Studie bei ARTE in Straßburg vor Promotionsexperten aus der TV- und Agenturbranche präsentiert.

30min

Forum Finkenau

Maximilian Kock

Maximilian Kock holds a professorship in audioproduction (degree programme media technology) at Ostbayerische Technische Hochschule Amberg-Weiden in Bavaria (D). His area of expertise is sound design, audioproduction and psychoacoustics. Born in 1965, degree as a graduate engineer in audio and video technology at Robert-Schumann- Conservatory Duesseldorf (D). Audio engineer and audio designer at radio stations and studios e.g. Deutschlandfunk (D), radio NRW (D), Rockamerica (USA). Head of audiodesign at the german TV-station ProSieben from 1994 to 2008. Several national and international awards for audio design. Since 2009 tutor for the Eyes&Ears of Europe-Academy in Cologne in the subject area of audioproduction.

Hans Schüttler

Talking Sounds – Die Entstehung eines Hörspiels | L4: Sound Design and Sound Art

Talking Sounds - Die Entstehung eines Hörspiels: • Wie wird die Klaviersaite zu einer Taucherflasche? • Wie kann ich mit Klängen und Geräuschen eine Geschichte erzählen? • Wie erzeugen Musik und Sound Spannung? In einem Vortrag stellt er seine Hörspielarbeit vor und gibt Auskunft über den Entstehungsprozess seiner Produktionen. Dabei gibt Hans Schüttler auch einen historischen Einblick in das Genre. So sind seit den 20iger Jahren unterschiedliche Hörspielformen entstanden vom Literarischen Hörspiel bis zu experimentellen Formen. Dieser Vortrag ist entstanden während des New York Electronic Art Festival 2013 im Studio Harvestworks (siehe unten).

30mins

Forum Finkenau

Hans Schüttler

Hans Schüttler studied piano with Nicolai Posnjakov, composition in Hamburg and New Music, Electronic Music in Darmstadt. At the university of Kassel, he headed the Artistic work in the media center and produced radio plays with the students and sound installations in collaboration with the Kunsthochschule Kassel. At 16.11.14 the live radio play Seepferdchen und Flugfische with poems by Hugo Ball with the NDR Big Band, a speaker and electronics was premiered. For the NDR detective series Radio Tatort Hans Schuettler produces the music and sounds. In the XFEL basic research center in Hamburg in 2015 Hans Schuettler converted measured data into sound.

Augusto Meijer

The Starry Night

“The Starry Night” is a 12-minute electroacoustic composition, heavily inspired by Vincent Van Gogh's life and work. The piece was completed in 2015, which was declared the “Van Gogh Year”, celebrating 125 years of inspiration after Van Gogh's death. “The Starry Night” is in essence a musical interpretation from Van Gogh's like-named masterpiece, completed in 1889. Moreover, this piece attempts to capture the essence of the great painter himself.

45mins

Studio 1

Augusto Meijer

Augusto Meijer is an electroacoustic music composer from the Netherlands. He obtained a Master of Music degree at the Utrecht School of the Arts, after successfully completing the European Media Master of Arts degree. During these studies, he focused strongly on electroacoustic music, and various composition techniques. His compositions are presented at various international venues, including the San Francisco Tape Music Festival, Linux Audio Conferences, International Computer Music Conferences, and many more. His work is strongly and inevitably based on personal experiences and fascinations.

John Nichols III

GATES

Completed in 2013, GATES is an electroacoustic composition that was partly inspired by the Pleiades constellation. A musical mapping of an image of the constellation occurs in the middle and at the conclusion of the composition. One can hear this depiction in the “wood block” timbres. This representation of Pleiades relates to a passage from Ignatius Loyola’s autobiography, St. Ignatius’ Own Story as Told to Luiz Gonzalez de Camara (1555). It was his [Ignatius’] greatest consolation to gaze upon the heavens and stars, which he often did, and for long stretches at a time, because when doing so he felt within himself a powerful urge to be serving our Lord. (From A Commentary on Saint Ignatius’ Rules for the Discernment Of Spirits, Jules J. Toner, 1979.) I chanced upon this unique passage after an evening of stargazing. Initially, I did not think much of it, but re-evaluated the occasion after unintentionally opening to the following passage in Vladimir Solovyov's essay, “Nationality from a Moral Point of View” (1895). ... “the Spanish genius Ignatius Loyola founded the order of the Jesuits for the struggle with Protestantism on peaceful grounds” (Ed. & Trans. Wozniuk). Following this discovery, and seeing as it was one of two mentions of Ignatius in Solovyov's entire collection of essays, I resolved to use the musical mapping of the constellation as a central and unifying element in this composition. The title refers to the use of noise gates during the creative process. Bending string and brass timbres, time stretched voice, and layers of filtered noise contribute to the drama of this composition. The composer is grateful for the assistance of the many musicians who participated in recording sessions that were utilized in this composition; especially Chicago-based musician, Tyler Beach, for his valuable insights and session performances on the acoustic and electric guitars.

45mins

Studio 1

John Nichols III

Confronting the immediacy of life, the compositions of John S. Nichols, III have been described by listeners as “cosmic,” “seismic,” and “tectonic.” His works are internationally recognized with awards such as the Grand Luigi Russolo Prize, First Prize in the ASCAP/SEAMUS Student Composer Commission Competition, First Prize Absolute in the International Composition Competition “Città di Udine,” as well as other recognitions from Prix Destellos, Métamorphoses, Exhibitronic, Open Circuit, Morton Gould ASCAP Young Composer Competition, Conlon Foundation, and WOCMAT. His compositions are published by Musique & Recherches, SEAMUS, Monochrome Vision, Exhibitronic, and ABLAZE Records. More at johnnicholsiii.com

Fiona Curran

BOXES

Installation: 'BOXES’ is a sonic-led film work in 3 parts, with a duration of 17 minutes. It was born out of a series of my own poetic works The Scientist Series. There are 9 poems based on the figure of a scientist who is attempting a distillation and scientific explanation of the grief she herself is suffering. The three films include a fragmentary poetic response where words escape and are shut in a variety of boxes; a process film made in a coffin factory, which includes a magical unexpected rhythm, and a dancer exploring, and coming to terms with the box she is required, eventually, to confine herself to. All of the films have a rich, mediated soundscape, designed to illuminate the static pauses on the journey to the grave. (password:art21boxes)

several time slots

3.030

Fiona Curran

Fiona Curran leads the MA in film making at Kingston University. She is a filmmaker, sound artist and poet. Her visual work explores sound mediated through film and with a particular interest in poetic portraiture, notions of sound translation and emotional essence. Her films have been show nationally and internationally. As a sonic artist, she has presented works at the RedSonic Festival, Car Boot Art Fair, and at Literary Kitchen. As a poet she has been published widely in the UK & Ireland. Her first collection, The Hail Mary Pass, was published by Wreckingball Press. A second collection, is imminent.

Roberto Zanata

Nero ipogeo

“Nero ipogeo” is the third of my acousmatic cycle of compositions dedicated to the colour “nero” (the first one “Nero metropolitano” [2014] and the second “Nero siderale” [2015] are published on a CD edited by “Taukay Edizioni Musicali”). It is mainly designed with the open source software supercollider. The sources of “Nero ipogeo” are audio gestures of high frequencies (not dissimilar to the whistle) and underground sounds on the verge of audibility or inaudibility. The principle of the compositional fragmentation and of the compositional reduction is taken to the absolute estreme. I sculpted a kind of sub-atomic composition that pick up the sounds from the crevices between one quantum event and the next one. The intention is to lead the listener to the most attentive and perceptive kind of listening.

45mins

Studio 1

Roberto Zanata

Roberto Zanata born in Cagliari, Italy where he also graduated in Philosophy. A composer, musician and musicologist in electronic music, he studied and graduated in composition and electronic music at the Conservatory of Cagliari. In the middle of nineties Roberto became active in Italy and abroad. He wrote chamber music, music for theatre, computer music, electroacoustic and acousmatic music as well as multimedia works. His music is published by Audiomat, Taukay and Vacuamoenia. In International competitions his works have been awarded Grands Prix Internationaux de Musique Electroacoustique (Bourges), Interference Festival (Poland), Sonom Festival (Mexico) and more. He actually teaches Electronic Music at the Conservatory of Bolzano (Italy).

Roberto Zanata

START – UP

“START - UP” is the second of my audio/video work generated by a given pattern using various node data. The main intention of this work it’s focused in the possibility to use audio/video objects to implement dynamical processes to the design of a kind of living sound-imagine organism. The goal is always the intention to create an intersection between the audio object and the video object and not just a simple synchronicity.

several time slots

3.030

Roberto Zanata

Roberto Zanata born in Cagliari, Italy where he also graduated in Philosophy. A composer, musician and musicologist in electronic music, he studied and graduated in composition and electronic music at the Conservatory of Cagliari. In the middle of nineties Roberto became active in Italy and abroad. He wrote chamber music, music for theatre, computer music, electroacoustic and acousmatic music as well as multimedia works. His music is published by Audiomat, Taukay and Vacuamoenia. In International competitions his works have been awarded Grands Prix Internationaux de Musique Electroacoustique (Bourges), Interference Festival (Poland), Sonom Festival (Mexico) and more. He actually teaches Electronic Music at the Conservatory of Bolzano (Italy).

Christian Dimpker

Studies on the notation of electroacoustic music

The »Studies on the notation of electroacoustic music« consist of four connected short studies. Study I deals with microphonics and non-instrumental sound sources, Study II with the transformation of these sonic events, Study III with the combination of transformed recordings and synthetic sound production and Study IV with different aspects of sound synthesis. In my works, I explore unconventional fields of notated sound. In order to be able to do that I have developed a coherent and consistent notation system for extended playing techniques and electroacoustic music.

45mins

Stairwell

Christian Dimpker

Christian Dimpker was born in 1982 in Hamburg, Germany. He is a composer and music theorist. Dimpker has studied Philosophy, History and Sound Studies. Additionally, he has a PhD in Musicology. Dimpker works as a composer, music engraver, author and lecturer in Berlin. His compositions explore unconventional fields of notated sounds. In order to be able to do this, he has developed an extensive notation system for extended playing techniques as well as electroacoustic music. This book with the title Extended Notation: The Depiction of the Unconventional has been released by the LIT Verlag publishers. Dimpker has received a number of awards and scholarships for his works. Engraving works include Lachenmann’s Schreiben. Moreover, he taught music theory in the UK and Hong Kong.

Roberto Musanti

Rotational chaos

It is an audiovisual work that explores the relationship between images and sounds, in particular through the relationship of the forms of solids of revolution and the sounds of chaotic generators. In the foreground, the solids of revolution, whose profile is partially determined by the harmonic components of some sounds produced by chaotic generators, highlight the contrast between the symmetries of their forms and the timbre of the sounds. In the background, a particle system evolves through the interaction of forces of attraction / repulsion, acting as a "backdrop" of the composition. Although the composition is abstract, because it is based mainly on the relationship between forms, and between them and the sounds, the graphic materials chosen and their assembly even with the sounds, lead us to a narrative interpretation of the work, constituting a sort of geo/math-fiction.

Stairwell

Roberto Musanti

Roberto Musanti, electronic musician and media artist, self-taught, graduated in electronic music, teaches computer science and multimedia programming. He has made concerts, performances and installations in Alghero (Italian Chapter of ACM SIGCHI), Amsterdam (Galleria “Opera Nuda”), Barcelona ( Festival “Zeppelin” – CCCB), Brasilia (Understand Visual Music Conference), Cagliari (Festivals “Kontakte”, “Music in touch”, “Polartist”), Lisbon (Festival “Musica Viva”), Marseilles (Festival “Electronicittà” ) , Naples (Festival “Evenienze – Konsequenz” ), Rome (“Decennale CEMAT”, Festival “Saturazioni”, “EMUFest” 2010 2012 2013, 2015), Sau Paolo (“Hypersonica” 2012, “File” Festival” 2013, 2015), Timisoara (Festival “Simultan” #6 #7 #8 2013, 2015 ), Ljubljana (“Video Evening #4′′ – Photon Gallery), Lviv (” MediaDepo”).

VacuaMœnia

Omelia al Vento

The track "Omelia al Vento" (litterally ‘Homily in the wind’) was conceived in the wake of the Ass.Cult. VacuaMœnia project to aesthetically revalue - in particular from the point of view of the sound as a transmediatic sense – places that have been abandoned for various reasons in the Sicilian ruralscapes. The idea of those years, developed by the Fascist regime, expressed a conviction that it was possible to build a city life “on board”, decentralizing the corporation
of farmers and inserting it in a context in which it was suf cient a school, a military police station, a church and a few other services to ful ll the needs of life. This decentralization had as purpose to resize the cultivations of the campaigns (from extensive to intensive), to facilitate the work and the rest of the peasants who were no longer forced, so to move daily from the countries to the lands, but the project soon failed because of its isolationism and dissolved completely during the years of economic Italian miracle and urban intensi cation of the 60s. It is in this regard that the Borghi (Italian name of these villages) pose a question: if it is true that few services for a few people to a single category in the middle of nowhere neces- sarily lead to abandonment (and smell like constriction), is it possible that a different attitude, an in nite mole of information, services, need (more or less induced), places of aggregation and inside (overcrowding) and external ( growth of cities) expansion is as such a value? The answer is in Vacuamoenia work. The idea of using sounds of the Borghi through digital and acoustic technologies daughters of the city while it does not solve the problem in a social and in an anthropological way, on the other hand serve to create an intellectual friction, a link between two extremes, which inevitably should be considered. The act of recording and the act of manipulation and formal construction insert “abandonment” sound material in a performance driven both by the wind and by the binary code, from wood to personal computers. The work we do by using the medium of the composition of soundscapes , wants to be a re-built as citizens of the “life of an urban centralization when there is no more life”, an atmosphere of abandonment that serves as a reference for possible “positive” high quality atmospheres in our urban living.

Studio 1

VacuaMœnia

VacuaMœnia (Fabio R. Lattuca, Pietro Bonanno), is an identitary and ecological sonic act aimed at the revolution of deeper meanings. Aesthetic revolution of Vacuamœnia starts from the places abandoned by man and the way they sound: a study of existing sounds and of those ones you can organize on the spot by hiking militancy, field-recording and the contact with the territory. VacuaMœnia was selected for Tempo Reale Collection “Sound at Work” and Symposium “Invisible Places” in Viseu (PT), has taken part in FKL Symposium in Oberhausen(DE), SAE Symposium in Univ. Of Kent(UK), Nuit Blanche in Paris (FR).

Wuan-chin Li

Ban Shan

This computer music work “Ban Shan” (means “play God” in Taiwanese)” is a story about a “Ba Jia Jiang” young medium (who also repre-sents as the bodyguards of Taiwanese god), when He began to have a lucid dream after a temple fair in the mid night. This young me-dium kept dancing and dancing in the dream, finally he became one of the gods. 5.1-surround sound setup had been designed to be with this work to draw out the scene of the temple fair in Taiwan, where usually “Ba Jia Jiang” mediums dance in martial troupes (Din-Tao:“陣頭” ) for god, with firecrackers and Taiwanese gongs sounding crossover (see figure 1).
Drum samples processed in different layers represented as the different spac-es/ worlds that this young medium boy was in the dream. Those different spaces sometimes stretch over, sometimes stand up indivisible, and also sometimes exist independently (see figure 2, 3). A sound sampled from Taiwanese Hand Gong was also triggered through de-signed effects. In the traditional legend, people believe the sound of Taiwanese Hand Gong leads the human spirit and ghost. The Taiwanese mediums “Ba Jia Jiang ( 家將)” originated from the Chinese folk beliefs and myths, usually referred to a few members of God, generally eight members. The general ar-gument of the existence of Ba Jia Jiang is from the eight generals catching evil exorcism for Wufu Emperor (五福 帝). These eight gen-erals are the gods of the underworld. They are also known as the bodyguards or attendants for the temples of the nether Gods such as Dongyue Emperor (東獄 帝), Yama (King of Hell, 閻羅 ) and Cheng Huang (City Gods, 城隍). Gradually Ba Jia Jiang evolved into the pi-oneers of Wang Ye (Royal Lord, 爺), Matsu (媽祖) and many other temples, as the body-guards of the Gods. Later on, the participation of believers in the temples dressed up as Ba Jia Jiang in order to defend the Gods. These ac-tions evolved into Taiwanese folk activities, which are part of the Wu Array (Military Array, 武陣) in Din Tao (Taiwanese troupes, 陣頭). Ba Jia Jiang is responsible for the capture of ghosts and evils, bringing safety and good lucks and providing protections. They contain a strong religious nature, and Din Tao (Tai-wanese troupes, 陣頭) are often seem myste-rious, threaten and serious. The composer who grown up in the temple area in Tainan City (Taiwan), hopes this computer music work will carry the charming fever from the traditional festival in her hometown to the world.

Controlroom 2

Wuan-chin Li

Wuan-chin Li is a former keyboardist of the metal band “Chthonic”. Her musical works crossover between classical, musical and film also had been feathered in Discovery Channel, ISMIR, and ICMC. She earned the Master of Music degree in Computer Music from the Peabody Conservatory of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Where she studied computer music performance and composition with Dr. Geoffrey Wright. Wuan-chin Li is currently one of the curators of sound and music in Guling Street Avant-Garde Theatre, and faculty members of Music Department of Fu-Jen University in Taipei.

Sibylle Pomorin

Surround Sound 1 and 2

The composition was designed and built specially for the Berlin Echos + Netze audio festival (November 2015) and the acoustic and spatial conditions of Studio 1 at Künstlerhaus Bethanien. The starting point and inspiration for the piece was the theme echoes and nets/ networks. “Raumklang 1 und 2” is made up of two parts that are identical in the stereo version. In the multichannel version the two parts are, however, set up completely different for the six speakers. The composition was broadcast in darkness.

Studio 1

Sibylle Pomorin

Sibylle Pomorin (*1956) studied Music and Composition in Münster and Hamburg. From 1982 to 1994 she toured (as a flutist and saxophonist) with improvising musicians, and also made concert tours with ensembles and compositions of her own all over Europe and in Israel. She has received composition commissions for ensembles, festivals, broadcasts and theatre. She has also been awarded numerous prizes (e.g., first prize at the international composition contest “Soundscapes voor 2000” in the Netherlands) and has been supported by working and study stays in New York, Istanbul and Mexico. Her music was performed at international festivals of contemporary music in Europe, Israel, Mexico, Australia and Canada.

Kira Belin

Forcefield Relaxation

This 6:51 min composition is a sound journey based on a narrative text with orientation, complication and resolution parts. Subject matter is inspired by relaxation instructions used in hypno- and other stress management therapies. By assigning appropriate tones and sounds to certain “trigger” key words and phrases, the aim of the piece is to create a futuristic cinematic experience, removed from pre- existing connotations surrounding the topic of meditation, and induce a brief alternate reality experience in a listener in a public setting.

Stairwell

Kira Belin

Kira Belin (b.1985, Odessa, UA) New York City & Glasgow – based experimental composer and multimedia artist. After acquiring experience in film scoring and conducting broad ethnomusicology research in Asian traditions, she started creating her own sonic projects, incorporating indigenous sound techniques and interdisciplinary composition models. Kira’s main focus is on the use of audio/visual technology as a language to interpret metaphysical concepts and ideas. In her work she attempts to explore “audio translations” of cultural systems, as well as personal acoustic environments.

Juan Carlos Vasquez

Albeniz Collage

The “Albeniz Collage" features a radical de-construction of Isaac Albeniz’ “Granada”, from the “Suite Española No.1, Op 47”. Is part of the “Collages” series, a critically acclaimed series of pieces based on digital sonic postmodern portraits of classical music composers. The “Collages” series use the concept of appropriation in art as a way to tend a bridge between electroacoustic music and the classical tradition of music composition. Not other sources than an original performance of “Granada" were used in the making of this composition. As many of the audio digital processes include random algorithms, the composer selected this version from close to 100 exports of the piece.

Studio 1

Juan Carlos Vasquez

Juan Carlos Vasquez is an awarded Helsinki-based composer, sound artist and researcher at the Media Lab Helsinki, Aalto University. Vasquez participates constantly as a sonic artist, composer and/or performer in events within Europe, Asia and America. In 2014 his critically acclaimed series of electroacoustic pieces inspired on classical composers, “Collages”, was released by american label Important Records / Cassauna, selling out shortly afterwards. His artworks have been premiered in 24 countries of 4 continents.

Anna Terzaroli

Dark Path #2

"Dark Path #2" is an acousmatic piece of electroacoustic music. The sounds used in the piece, processed, then "composed" together to create the musical work, were recorded in a soundscape dear to author, located in the Italian region of Marche. "Dark Path #2" can be defined as a journey through light, shadow, shape, color, drifts and landings.

45mins

Studio 1

Anna Terzaroli

Marcelo Gimenes

Smart iSound (SiS)

Smart iSound (SiS) is a sound installation that explores the concepts of embodiment and audience control. It is a contribution to the investigation in the area of new interfaces on how new technological tools can be used to enhance and, to a certain extent, expand our natural ability to communicate musically. The body, as the natural mediator between the physical world and our mental representations, plays a central role in our musical experiences. In this context, music is not passively experienced but collectively made, resulting from the interaction between a sound producing machine and the audience, who contributes with the diverse and rich personal backgrounds of each one of its members. To support the installation and afford audience control and interaction, a number of technological tools have been designed and implemented, including a bespoke distributed computer system (server and smartphone app). iBeacons and a quadraphonic surround sound system are also used.
Sound sources of SiS originate from an electroacoustic-algorithmic composition and are reproduced (in Logic Pro and PureData) in response to control and (inter)actions of the audience. Control data, collected from all the participants, is sent via a local network to a central server on a desktop computer which runs the algorithmic component of the installation: sounds are triggered, manipulated and positioned in the surround space depending on the participant’s behaviour. The whole performance takes approximately 15 minutes. The audience is invited to move around the space holding their smartphones where SiS is performed (the ‘performance space’), and a number of sound regions (a major artistic concept of SiS) is defined in connection with the beacons previously installed in the venue. Movement and indoor location of the smartphones is constantly monitored. The relevance (volume) of each one of the tracks of the composition is defined by the number of participants that are next to each beacon. Audience is also able to control the position of the sound sources within the quadraphonic sound system with their smartphones (using the gyroscope ‘yaw’). Additional data produced by the smartphones’ sensors control other parameters of the sound producing machine. In addition to sending information to the server, the smartphone app running on the participants’ smartphones also receive instructions in real time on specific behaviour they are expected to perform. Therefore, the communication between the algorithmic component of the installation (in the server) and the participants in the performance space is bidirectional. These instructions are received in the form of flashes and changes of colour in the app background as well as vibrations of the smartphone. Directions on how to install and operate the app (freely available on the Internet) will be given at the conference. A similar sound installation (Embodied iSound) has been performed at the Peninsula Arts Contemporary Music Festival, Plymouth University in 2016, when all the components of the system, including audience participation, as well as the performance of the computer systems (server and smartphone app) were tested.

Controlroom 5

Marcelo Gimenes

Pianist, composer and experimental electronic musician Marcelo Gimenes’ career includes a comprehensive array of activities in different settings and styles, from classical to contemporary music and jazz improvisation. He is particularly interested in exploring music as an interactive medium through which people communicate and interconnect. To achieve that, he develops bespoke technological tools that are incorporated in his performances. Marcelo holds a PhD in computer music from Plymouth University where he currently develops computer systems and mobile device apps that incorporate unique intelligent music generative tools. His research interests include music cognition, evolution and machine musicianship.

Arsalan Abedian

Elektroakustische Szenen (Cstück Nr.3)

In diesem Stück gibt es verschiedene akustische Szenarien, die sich nacheinander entfalten. Die Szenen wurden von dem Tagebüchern zweier Personen, möglicherweise Komponisten, inspiriert. Es stellt in abstrakter Weise Situationen dar, die diesen zwei Persönlichkeiten in ihrem täglichen Leben in verschiedenen Ländern wiederfahren. Ihre Leben sind geprägt von Nachrichten, persönlichen und globalen, die ihren Einfluss ausüben. Das Stück ist in Csound geschrieben und steht an der Grenze der Musique concrète und Hörspiel. Momentan gibt es 7 Szenen.

Studio 1

Arsalan Abedian

Arsalan Abedian was born in 1984 in Tehran, Iran. In 2007 graduated from Azad university with a bachelor’s degree in composition, in 2011 from Art university of Tehran with a master’s degree in composition, and in 2014 from Hanover University of Music, Drama and Media with a master’s degree in electronic composition, where he studied with Oliver Schneller. He studies composition (Soloklasse) at the Hanover University of Music by Joachim Heintz, Ming Tsao and Gordon Williamson. His works have been performed by different ensembles in different festivals around the world.

Katharina Kellermann

HOW TO HEAR THE INIVISBLE

HOW TO HEAR THE INIVISBLE - a sound mapping of the postcolonial memory landscape of Hamburg Hamburg ́s city area is a landscape of postcolonial memories. History is carried on into our presence in the form of traces and feedbacks. Along the river Elbe, historical themes resonate back into our everyday life: from the suburbs to the townhall appear echoes of the colonial past and in other places, there is just silence. Hamburg ́s colonial history becomes visible in the form of locations, designations and urban planning. However, historical
backgrounds, resistance and struggle, alternative perspectives on history and the continuities of colonial politics remain invisible. Acoustically mediated counter-narratives are to be developed in order to open up another imagination and perception of the city. My investigation is concerned with questions like what amount of information is necessary to commemorate acoustically, the importance of language in remembering / commemorating and how language-based information can be transformed into sound. The contribution offers an impression of an alternative acoustic mapping of Hamburg and at the same time reflects on how cities and spatial experience change if invisible things become audible and how a different perception of the past can arise in this form of remembering. These approaches seek for alternative description methods and possibilities to re-enact and receive knowledge, to fragment common narratives (and thereby to expand them) and finally to work artistically on the question of whether and how cultures of remembrance can be organized differently if they work in an acoustic rather than a visual way. HOW TO HEAR THE INVISIBLE examines through the method of sound mapping how it can be heard, what is not seen and what becomes sensible when we hear. The project asks what and how we remember by listening and it searches for new perceptions of the city and history through forms of acoustic commemoration - by transforming the memory landscape Hamburg into sound.

Stairwell

Katharina Kellermann

Katharina Kellermann studied at the Institute for Applied Theatre Studies in Giessen, since then she has worked as an audioartist in the field of performance and installation. She is part of the feminist media art collective SWOOSH LIEU. Besides that she has created soundwalks and audio pieces such as recently the installation In the vicinity – an assembly in between history and memory at CCA Tel Aviv. In her work she tries to develop formal-aesthetic approaches based on emancipatory discourses and to create temporary heterotopias. Since 2015 she is a PhD candidate at the graduate school “Performing Citizenship“ with an artistic research project on Sound as a commemorative cultural medium.

Kathrin Hunze

An Audiovisual Treatise On The Genetic Code

Signs and sign systems, i.e. codes, are part of our daily life. Some of them are simple and intuitively comprehensible. Others are complex and difficult to understand for non-experts. Nevertheless they play an important role in our everyday social life. A prominent example are the various codes used in digital information technology. These have been developed and optimised over decades and can be considered a major triumph of the human mind. It is fascinating to realise that nature was a pioneer in that respect. The genetic code, basis of all life, is structurally very similar to the digital codes developed by humans and by now we understand how efficient and highly developed the genetic code is. In our bodies as much as in the bodies of all living beings processes analogous to processes in computers, which however seem to be rather abstract to most of us, constantly occur. Aim of this work is to enable us to experience this fascination. To this avail the genetic code is analysed from the perspective of semiotics. Inspired by the code itself, a sign system is developed and used to display two important mechanisms of the genetic code, transcription and translation, as audiovisual processes. In particular this should make it possible to transport microscopic processes, usually invisible to us, into our macroscopic reality. This aim shall be achieved by an audiovisual room installation.

Stairwell

Kathrin Hunze

Kathrin Hunze, born 1983 in Bonn, currently lives in Berlin. She studied Communication Design at the HAW Hamburg. During her studies she was concerned with audiovisual media in space and specialized in interdisciplinary contexts at the department of modern media. Her topics such as social circumstances and phenomena in natural sciences are approached from design- and art-specific angles and put into a new context. In her conceptual works Hunze does not limit herself to a singular and definitive means of presentation, but experiments with analogue and digital media in space and considers the contentual aspect to be an important additional element.

Dominik Schlienger

Leluhelikvartetti

Leluhelikvartetti is an homage to Karlheinz Stockhausen's concept of the Helikopter-Streichquartett, wherein the players of a string quartet are placed in a helicopter each, together with a pilot and a broadcasting engineer equipped with a camera. The sound and images of the quartet are broadcast to a nearby concert venue, where the audience can hear the instruments' sound mix with the sound of the helicopters outside and watch the musicians perform on giant screens. Leluhelikvartetti uses, due to funding cuts in academia throughout Europe, toy helicopters. As the toy helicopters don't accommodate much personnel, some trickery is needed, whereby the individual
instruments' sound will seemingly, as per magic*, come from the helicopters flying around the performance space. The Free Improvisation String Quartet, (FISQ, Hermanni Yli-Tepsa: Violin, Dominik Schlienger: Viola, Sergio Castrillon: Cello; Timo Pyhälä: Bass), in a further protest against any rules and regulations, will not adhere to any form of score, but will happily take cues and inspiration from the flight of the toy 'copters, in a audio-kinaesthetic conversation with the pilots. The sound of the helicopter blades mixes with the sound of the actual instruments, the trajectories of the players through the performance space intermingle with the public, the flight of the helicopters respond to the musical dynamic. " *The magic: The performance space shall be a circular area of approx. 12 m diameter, wherein 4 toy quadcopters of type WLToys V262 are flown by 4 pilots, moving around freely. The audience surrounds this area. The players of FISQ are set-up somewhere at some distance from the performance area. Their instruments are close-miked, so that each instrument is available as one mono channel to the sound system at the centre of the performance space. In the centre of the performance space stand 8 near coincident radially outwards facing loudspeakers of type Genelec 1029 or similar. The loudspeakers send an acoustic measurement signal just above the frequency range audible to the human ear. (18 - 30 kHz) The four toy helicopters are equipped with wireless microphones: Using time difference of arrival measurements by correlating the original signal on the loudspeakers with the measured signal on the helicopters, the positions in relation to the loudspeakers can be estimated. The positions are then used to apply amplitude panning to the signal from the quartet's instruments, thus spatializing the quartet's sound as if each instrument was playing from one of the helicopters. (That is, for an audience surrounding the performance space.) Further, the musicians of FISQ are also equipped with wireless audio senders, allowing them to move around freely during the performance. The multiple layers of audio (direct sound from the quartet; amplified sound through the loudspeaker array; the sound of the the helicopters) and the layers of movement (the helicopters trajectories; the musicians trajectories through the audience) create a densely woven spatial narrative.

25min

Produktionslabor

Dominik Schlienger

Dominik Schlienger with FISQ and the Leluheli-Pilots Dominik Schlienger, is a Composer Researcher at the University of the Arts Helsinki, Sibelius Academy Centre for Music & Technology. He researches technologies for spatial interaction in music, and thus devised the Leluhelikvartetti, (Finnish for “toy helicopter quartet”) – a situation, rather than a composition for string quartet and four toy helicopters and their pilots. FISQ, the Free Improvisation String Quartet, formed on initiation of Timo Pyhälä, who asked the other 3 members to perform with him in a concert at the first Helsinki Free Improv Mini Festival, at Galleria Kolmas Kerros in 2014. As there is not much point in rehearsing free improvisation, the concert was the first time the 4 players actually met. Since then FISQ performed many times, by request of a steadily growing audience. (Hermanni Yli-Tepsa, Violin; Dominik Schlienger, Viola; Sergio Castrillon, Cello; Timo Pyhälä, Bass.) The four pilots are: Petri Lehtola, Riku Vuorensola, and Lukas Novok, musicians and students at the UNIARTS Sibelius Academy Centre for Music and Technology and Moritz Cartheuser, from artist collective Catlysti, Helsinki. Links to individual artists: Dominik:http://www.uniarts.fi/dominik-schlienger http://www.hipbone-prod.com/ Sergio: http://sergiocastrillon.com/ Hermanni: https://soundcloud.com/hermanniylitepsa Timo: http://www.helsinkisculpture.info/pyhala.html http://mcartheuser.bplaced.net/wordpress/

Peter Wießenthaner

Hitmachine

hitmachine • sound and colours installation for filter sounds, animation and 7 loudspeakers, presented as an installation or as a play version. 42 different filters unite to a compact, 7-voices, percussion-like machine. 6 other filters generate sound- like things, they flank the main stream of the events. hitmachine is a dynamic system in which brownsche equations are modified in her edge terms by the sound data in MAX. hitmachine runs independently and without repetition. Circle-like recurring processes with different time intervals, interlock over and over again anew, while the at the same time filters receive new parametres and form the musical circumstances anew. Lies to these expiries a 6-fold chance generator which determines the pitch transformation values in queue-shaped manner, temporal expiries initiates and finishes. A not end-disposed expiry of extremely high variability. hitmachine generates a connection of tone and picture in an almost infinite variation. By data of the amplitudes and the pitches become lines which are programmed in PROCESSING about which screen moves. By these data the lines keep her tempo with them above the surface move, her line strength, her length, direction, form and her colours. The algorithms lead to a variety in movement, colour and size of the lines which corresponds to the variety of the musical expiry. hitmachine is a work in progress. Programming PROCESSING: Keith O‘Hara, Peter Wiessenthaner Programming MAX: Peter Wiessenthaner Performances of hitmachine: Festival in Cracow and Schiphorst, college of music Munich, Signalraum Munich, SKOP-Festival and PHONOPHON in Frankfurt. Next presentation: New York, INTERMEDIA, Braunschweig, BLACK-HOLE-FACTORY.

60min

Studio Tide

Peter Wießenthaner

Peter Wießenthaner, *1951, composer, audiovisual live-electronic concertperformances. After the flute studies turning to the composition with live-electronics. Substantially for his work with live-electronics a contact with Luigi Nono was in the experimental studio of the SWF in Freiburg. Development of a flute collection with new hole- and sliding-flutes. He performed his works in different European towns and in the USA and South America. He is the founder of SKOP – www. skop-ffm. de – an interdisciplinary straightened organisation in Frankfurt. 23 years became a variety of events carried out. MAX and PROCESSING are the platform for his work.

Clemens von Reusner

Continuous Flow Machines

Turbomachines work with rotating solid cages (blades, vanes) in gases and liquids, and often acoustically produce a uniform noise in a wide frequency range. They usually manifest a tonal component (expressing the number of blades multiplied by the speed), which is audible in amanner akin to a root or fundamental. By cavitations in fast flowing liquids, acoustically significant deviations from the uniform noise areinduced. These deviations mostly have a percussive character. The circle and the circular motion are important (indeed, essential) for the operation of turbomachines. Both the shape and the structure of this work are derived from this overarching idea of a circle, the constant flow and rotation as a key aspect of turbomachinery movement and the increase and decrease in vertical density. Sciencentists working in the field of continuous flow machines not only work with real test rigs and real machines, but also and increasingly with computer simulations. This is reflected in the composition in that as the piece progresses the edited recordings of turbomachinery are replaced by "acoustic models". These models were obtained from spectral analysis of the recorded sounds and then resynthesized by means of additive sound synthesis. The spatial concept of the piece reflects the principle of rotation of turbo machinery. The 3rd order ambisonic method, realized here with the sound synthesis language Csound, makes it possible to individually place sounds in a two-or three-dimensional acoustic space and move them along discrete trajectories. In the virtual acoustic space of this composition the individual sounds are moved in circular orbits with different radii at different speeds and in different directions. Ideally the audience is placed (whether standing or walking) in a darkened room within a circle of 8 speakers; the diameter of the circle might exceed ten meters.

60min

Produktionslabor

Clemens von Reusner

Clemens von Reusner is a composer and soundartist based in Germany, who is focused on acousmatic music. He studied musicology and music-education, drums with Abbey Rader and Peter Giger. Since the end of the 1970s he has been engaged in electroacoustic music, radio plays and soundscape compositions. At the end of the 1980s development of the music software KANDINSKY MUSIC PAINTER. Member of the German Composers Society (DKV). 2006-2009 member of the board of the EUROPEAN FORUM KLANGLANDSCHAFT (FKL). 2010-2013 member of the board of the German Society For Electroacoustic Music (DEGEM). Numerous national and international broadcasts and performances of his compositions in Americas, Asia, Europe. www.cvr-net.de

Yiorgis Sakellariou

Silentium

Silentium is an electroacoustic piece based on sounds of bells and church organs that where recorded during a residency at gallery Školská 28 in Prague, in December 2015. In 1980 Jonathan Harvey composed Mortuos Plango Vivos Voco, arguably his most significant work. The piece is based on two sounds: the tenor bell at Winchester Cathedral in England and the voice of the composers' son, who was a chorister there.
The sounds were digitally processed at IRCAM in Paris and resulted to an octaphonic electroacoustic composition. In a similar manner, Silentium is based on sounds of churches in Prague. Besides bells, the piece also explores the properties of the churches’ sonic atmospheres; the silences, the crackling of wooden chairs, the water dripping down the pipelines and any other distinguishing sonic element. Moreover, the piece includes recorded and manipulated sounds of church organs which replace the voice as an organic and musical element to the composition. The transformation of sounds in Silentium aims at expanding their physical boundaries without necessarily losing their sonic identity. The use of technology is not merely a tool for sound manipulation but an exploration on the threshold of sonic perception which functions as a spiritual revelation. The piece will be performed in complete darkness, with the purpose of creating a profound and transcendental sonic experience.

25min

Holodeck

Yiorgis Sakellariou

Yiorgis Sakellariou is an experimental and electroacoustic music composer with a background in classical and Mediterranean folk music. Since 2002 he has been active internationally being responsible for solo and collaboration albums, having composed music for short films and theatrical performances, leading workshops and ceaselessly performing his music around the globe. His current research as a PhD student at Coventry University focuses on the ritual of electroacoustic music. Yiorgis Sakellariou is a member of the Athenian Contemporary Music Research Centre and the Hellenic Electroacoustic Music Composers Association. Since 2004 he has curated the label Echomusic

Todd Harrop

Comprovisation

My concept uses machine learning and dynamic microtonality: to perform a 'comprovisation‘ (composition-improvisation) on drums and percussion, including 'objets trouvés', from which a computer will identify pre-classified timbral gestures, i.e. changes in the audio signatures of my performance potentialities. This data will inform live algorithmic processes of real-time sampling and filtering, and especially synthesized accompaniment in three microtonal scales based on a consonant yet unfamiliar 6:7:9 septimal minor triad. These non-octave scales are derived from dividing a perfect fifth (frequency ratio 3/2) into 8, 13 and 18 equal divisions. Modulation will be affected by subtly changing the size of a single generator interval which will effectively collapse or split apart a scale, transforming it into one of its neighbours.

Studio Tide

Todd Harrop

Canadian artist Todd Harrop is a Dr.Sc.Mus. candidate at the Hochschule für Musik und Theater Hamburg specializing in non-octave scales. He has presented his artistic research at conferences in Boston, Cologne, Dublin and Hamburg, and authored a chapter for the book 1001 Mikrotöne (Bockel Verlag). His compositions have been performed in Canada, America, Germany, Italy, Slovenia and New Zealand by various ensembles such as the Penderecki String Quartet. Not excluding short-lived stints as a dancer or actor, Harrop has worn many different hats as a performer, from orchestral timpanist to modern dance accompanist to indie pop drummer.

Chromahelix

Chromahelix: Freesound.org Live Act

We are an electroacoustic ensemble established in Barcelona, exploring different sonic textures, sonic visualization and exploring experimental live compositional methods. During the composition the audience can explore different sounds from Freesound.org platform and drive the musical and visual experience. We promote the usage of the Freesound.org API through education and artistic expressions. During the installations of our audiovisual system, we teach how to access in real time sounds in the Freesound data base, and different way to route them into a multichannel surround system. Today, Freesound.org has over 240,000 sounds available, more than 50,000 daily visits and more than 4 million people registered on the platform with an excess of 65 million downloads. The audiovisual performance is based on an ambisonics system to create an immersive 3D audio experience. Supported by: Generalitat de Catalunya: Departament de Cultura Ajuntament de Barcelona: Barcelona Cultura Music Technology Group Phonos Freesound.org Universitat Pompeu Fabra

45mins

Holodeck

Chromahelix

Chromahelix is an electro­acoustic ensemble based in Barcelona, formed by different professionals in the audio technology area and artists, involved in the Sound and Music Computing Master at the Universitat Pompeu de Fabra. They expose the spectators to different sonic textures, combining minimalist soundscapes and rhythms. For each of their presentations different electroacoustic chains are designed, integrated with the visual experience. During the composition the audience can explore different sounds from Freesound.org and drive the musical and visual experience. The audiovisual performance is based on an ambisonics system to create an immersive 3D audio experience. For this presentation the audience will interact by proposing sounds to use, with Freesound in real time. Today, Freesound.org has over 240,000 sounds available, more than 50,000 daily visits and more than 4 million people registered on the platform with an excess of 65 million downloads. The release of this cultural and social project was during the 7th edition of Mutek [ES], one of the most important festivals of digital arts, according to Resident Advisor and they are preparing a performance for the Kling gut! symposium of sound, in Hamburg.

Kosmas Giannoutakis

Contraction point

Contraction point is a meta-composition which integrates a human agent, a musical instrument, a performance space and a feedback delay network system. Two interconnected feedback processes take place in the “here and now”. The live sound of the instrument is recorded and play-backed by 12 spatialized variable delay lines. The sound of the delay lines is physically mixed in the acoustic space, recorded by the microphone and play-backed again in a continuous flow. The resulted unexpected sound textures can be interpreted as emergent phenomena of this non-linear complex feedback process.
The gestures of the performer are extended in time, space and frequency, which are naturally interconnected by the feedback delay network. The process can be theoretically interpreted as the scattering of sound inside a 10 kilometer long multidimensional room, with ist faces moving in variable constant speeds creating the transposing Doppler effects. In the parallel process the performer makes 12 listening walkthroughs in order to locate the speaker with the higher transposed delay line. When he/she returns to his/ her instrument, he/she plays the estimated note (notes and speakers are predefined in a fixed relationship, speaker 1 → C, speaker 2 → C#, speaker 3 → D, etc). The system evaluates the input note and contracts the transposition range of the delay lines accordingly. Sound is the only interface that interconnects the human agent with the digital system. Essential interaction is achieved, since the performer listens to the output of the system and acts accordingly while the system tracks the performer's replies and change parameters of its internal states. After the 12th evaluation the system freezes the range contraction and reduces the window time of the delay lines. The emergent effect is the loss of space perception which is gradually transformed into timbre perception. Theoretically, the 10 kilometer long room contracts to a tiny space of a resonant body of a musical instrument. The achieved game score describes the final speeds of the faces of the multidimensional resonant body, which is heard as pitch shifted resonance. In every performance a different game score will be achieved, leading to a different resonant timbre. If the performer achieve a perfect score (never reached so far in any rehearsal or concert), the transposition of all delay lines will be zero and we will get the normal amplification resonance of the standard musical instrument.

30min

Produktkonslabor

Kosmas Giannoutakis

Kosmas Giannoutakis creates dynamic sound artworks by interconnecting human agents, sound bodies, acoustic sites and digital audiovisual systems through the medium of sound. Using feedback mechanisms in order to create complexity and to control non-linearity, he is researching the catalysis and communication of emergent sound phenomena. Performances in inSonic2015 and next_generation in ZKM, Soundislands Festival in Singapore, Gaudeamus Muziekweek in Utrecht, GENERATE! Festival in Tübingen, EUROMicroFest in E-Werk Freiburg, XXIX Summer Sounds Festival in Finland and the Avaton Music Festival in Cyprus. The Institute of Electronic Music and Acoustics – IEM is the current inspiring environment for his interdisciplinary art experiments.

For the Film Music and DIY Synthesizer Workshops you MUST pre-register!

Follow the links below to secure your spot!

Composing

Contributors

ALL CONTRIBUTORS AT THE klingt gut! SYMPOSIUM 2016

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Anna Symanczyk

Germany

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Anna Terzaroli

Italy

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Arnd Kaiser

Germany

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Arsalan Abedian

Germany

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Ask Kæreby

Denmark

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Augusto Meijer

Netherlands

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Beata Anna Targosz

Germany

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Carla Bley

United States

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Carlos Piqueras

Spain

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Christian Dimpker

Germany

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Christine Aufderhaar

Germany

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Chromahelix

Spain

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Clemens von Reusner

Germany

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Cornelius Ringe

Germany

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Dominik Schlienger

Finland

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Eldad Tsabary

Canada

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Fabian Röttcher

Germany

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Felix Eichas

Germany

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Felix Kubin

Germany

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Fiona Curran

United Kingdom

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Hans Schüttler

Germany

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Jan Klug

Netherlands

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Johann-Markus Batke

Germany

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John Groves

Germany

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John Nichols III

United States

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Juan Carlos Vásquez

Finland

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Katharina Kellermann

Germany

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Kathrin Hunze

Germany

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Kira Belin

United States

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Kosmas Giannoutakis

Austria

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Lars Ohlendorf

Germany

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Ludwig Müller

Germany

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Manuel G. Richter

Germany

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Marcelo Gimenes

United Kingdom

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Martyn Ware

United Kingdom

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Matthias Kuhr

Germany

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Maximilian Kock

Germany

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Mehmet Can Özer

Turkey

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Michael Williams

France

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Myungduk Kim

Germany

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Nicolas Collins

United States

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Pascal Dietrich

Germany

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Peter Wiessenthaner

Germany

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Phil Kamp

Germany

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Philipp Ludwig Stangl

Germany

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Ralf Zuleeg

Germany

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Robert Bramkamp

Germany

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Roberto Musanti

Italy

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Roberto Zanata

Italy

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Sara Pinheiro

Portugal

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Sebastian-Thies Hinrichsen

Germany

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Sibylle Pomorin

Germany

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Steffen Armbruster

Germany

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Steve Swallow

United States

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Thomas W. Kraupe

Germany

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Todd Harrop

Germany

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VacuaMœnia

Italy

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Vadim Keylin

Russia

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Wuan-chin Li

Taiwan

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Yiorgis Sakellariou

United Kingdom

FAQ

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

The Call for Contributions closes on February 14th. The proposals are then submitted to the jury and you will be notified about their decision by March 7th.

The full program will be published after March 14th, but please keep an eye on our Facebook feed and website, as we will be releasing information about confirmed workshops and invited lecturers beforehand.

Registering for workshops will be done onsite at the registration desk, unless stated otherwise. Please keep an eye on our Facebook feed and website for more information regarding our workshop program.

The registration desk will be open starting Wednesday at 12:00 and then daily from 9:00–18:00.

For early registration, take the opportunity to come to the registration desk on Wednesday or early Thursday.

Workshops are free (except e.g. material costs, which will be noted separately), but have limited seats. We suggest you check-in early, to reserve space for the workshop you are interested in.

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